Tessy
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2016 11:03 pm

The long and winding road of electric car adoption

Tue Jul 25, 2017 4:49 pm

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/0/l ... -adoption/

So this article came out of the UK. Not much if any North American data but that really is ok because when it comes Europe and Asia North America is far behind in all aspects of the EV . The article is long but I give it a two thumbs up - it looks at facts and variables in those facts and makes some very points and observations. For example, China sold almost half of the global sales of EV's in 2016. Globally we had around 750,000 electric cars sold and China sold about 336,000 of them. China has approximately 660,000 electric cars on the road right now but in fact it is not the leading in deploying ev's successfully into the market - Norway is. Almost one third of all cars sold in Norway last year were EV's. Remember these are the same bunch who run ferries on batteries they ain't joking when it comes down to this type of technology and adapting the country for it. What if any impact this will have on the North American car manufacturers I don't know but I do know North America is not found beside Europe in studies like this because we are all so hooray hooray for tiny adjustments and improvements when it comes to getting our vehicles electrified.

Tessy
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2016 11:03 pm

Re: The long and winding road of electric car adoption

Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:44 pm

Found this article addressing some of the concerns for the change over to EV's. I find it interesting this type of stuff is not being discussed more in the media.

The challenges and consequences of moving to electric cars
The Star Online
Jul 27, 2017
Britain will ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2040 in an attempt to reduce air pollution that could herald the end of over a century of popular use of the fossil fuel-guzzling internal combustion engine.
Following are some of the possible challenges and consequences related to the decision:
Electric/Hybrid Market share
In Europe, only 0.2% of new passenger cars sold were fully electric in 2016 (1.3% if hybrids are included).
Threat to jobs
A combustion-engine car has 1,400 components to build the motor, exhaust system and transmission. An electric vehicle’s battery and electric motor has only 200 components, according to analysts at ING.
The average combustion engine takes about 3.5 hours to make, while the average transmission requires 2.7 hours of assembly. An electric motor takes about 1 hour to assemble, according to consultants AlixPartners.
German auto industry association VDA has said a ban of combustion engined vehicles in 2030 would threaten more than 600,000 German industrial jobs, of which 436,000 are at car companies and suppliers.
In Europe, there are about 126 plants making combustion engines, employing 112,000 people (66,000 making powertrain, 46,000 making transmissions). The largest engine plant in Europe is Volkswagen's factory in Kassel.
The switch to hybrid and electric cars will create 25,000 new jobs for carmakers between 2015 and 2030, consultants Alix Partners said in their Global Automotive Outlook study for 2017.
Plug-in hybrid vehicles will help protect jobs in the short run since they combine electric and combustion engine technology. A hybrid car takes 50% more time, or up to 9 hours longer, to make than cars with only a combustion engine.
Tipping point
60% of the cost of electric cars are in the battery. Costs have been prohibitive but are falling rapidly. Average battery costs have come down from over US$1,000 (RM4,280) per kilowatt hour in 2010, to around US$227 (RM970) in 2016 ,according to analysts at Barclays.
The “tipping point” when the cost of battery electric vehicles will reach parity with combustion engined equivalents will come when batteries reach a cost of US$100 (RM428) per kilowatt hour. This will happen between 2020 and 2030, Barclays analysts say.
By 2025 the total cost of ownership between electric and combustion will reach parity (once taxes, fuel costs etc are included) – this time frame being brought forward if diesel gets higher taxation, analysts say.
As a result, Europe could become a 100% pure battery electric vehicle market by 2035, according to ING.
Investment
A key obstacle to making electric cars popular is the amount of time it takes to recharge, and a lack of charging stations.
London needs to spend €10bil (RM50.2bil) to get charging infrastructure to a level where retail buyers can practically own an electric car, AlixPartners said. Almost none of that spending has been earmarked so far.
Britain’s ban, a challenge for Germany?
In 2016, Britain was the largest single export market for German manufacturers world-wide. (Fewer cars are imported to China and US because German carmakers already have factories in those markets). They sold 800,000 new cars there, or 20% of their overall global exports. — Reuters

Tessy
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2016 11:03 pm

Re: The long and winding road of electric car adoption

Fri Aug 25, 2017 3:15 am

This is a long and windy road so OK, the electric car is the future. But what plans are there for scrapping the billions of cars running on gas. They won't just disappear. The used automotive lubricants need to be drained and recycled. The steel, plastic, etc. will need to be disposed of in an environmentally friendly way. An emormous task. Better start planning now instead of waking up 30 years from now to an environmental horror scene

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